• SeoulHollandPavilionPhotobyJacquesandre.jpgSeoul Design Festival Holland Pavilion. Photo by Jacques & André
    news 4 december 2014

    Report #2 Seoul: The Holland Pavilion

    In the context of exploring new possibilities for the international presentation of Dutch design, 10 designers participated in this year’s Seoul Design Festival with the backing of the Creative Industries Fund NL. These designers presented their projects in the Holland Pavilion. Bruno Vermeersch (Jacques & André) designed the pavilion as a plaza, a meeting place with lampposts and benches that would allow the public to mingle and talk about the exhibited projects and the theme.

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  • SeoulDesignWeek20141.jpg
    news 1 december 2014

    Report #1 Seoul Design Week: An Introduction to Heritage, Crafts and Materials

    In the context of the Open Call for Participation in the Seoul Design Festival, a group of 10 Dutch designers was selected to travel to South Korea last week. In advance of presenting their products and concepts during the Seoul Design Festival, these designers participated in a range of enlightening activities.

    more

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    news 21 november 2014

    Publication architect Karsten part of heritage campaign

    Thomas Karsten (1884 – 1945) was one of a small group of modern Dutch architects that included men like Henri Maclaine Pont and C.P. Wolf Schoemaker who developed their careers in the Dutch East Indies in the first half of the twentieth century. Karsten laid the foundations of modern urban Indonesia with work represented in Semarang, Solo, Padang, Palembang and Medan.

    more

  • juliavanzantenelements2.jpg
    news 21 november 2014

    Designer presentations at Seoul Design Festival

    One of the major challenges facing modern society is ageing populations. The Netherlands is not alone in having to cope with people living longer – today almost half its population is aged 50 years or more. South Korea is also dealing with exponential growth in the population aged 65 and above. The Creative Industries Fund NL selected 10 Dutch designers to share their perspectives on the social challenges presented by a greying population. They are presenting their products and concepts during the Seoul Design Festival 2014: Well-Aged Life, Well-Balanced Design.

    more

  • DesigningaCountryCreativeindustriesinthe.jpg
    news 21 november 2014

    Government publication about the creative industries

    The creative industries are highly significant for job and wealth creation, as well as for finding solutions to complex social issues. The creative industries are also helping to protect and revitalize cultural heritage, as well as opening the minds of younger generations to its value. This was the conclusion of more than 40 countries from Asia and Europe during the Sixth Asia-Europe Culture Ministers Meeting (ASEM).

    more


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Japan–NL exchange in the field of Arita ceramics

28 november 2014
The European Ceramic Work Centre (EKWC) has entered into a joint venture with the Saga Ceramics Research Laboratory in the town of Arita in Saga Prefecture, a region in southwest Japan that is renowned for its ceramic products. This cooperation falls within an agreement between Saga Prefecture and the Dutch Embassy in Tokyo that was signed in November 2013, with the aim of initiating exchange between Saga and the Netherlands in the Creative Industries. This will involve talented designers collaborating with the region’s producers (traditional and modern) and the fostering of teamwork between Dutch institutions and those in Saga.
In 2016 the Saga Prefecture is celebrating the 400th anniversary of Arita porcelain, which the VOC – the Dutch East India Company – exported throughout Europe via the Netherlands from the mid-17th century. With these historical ties in mind, Saga is keen to cooperate with Dutch designers and institutions in order to reinvigorate the region’s ceramics production, which has shrunk to 20% of the production level during the heyday of the late 1980s, and reconquer the European market.

The cooperation agreement between the EKWC and the Saga Ceramics Research Laboratory was signed during a visit by EKWC’s Director, Ranti Tjan, to Arita. Between 19 and 23 October he visited several local producers of this renowned porcelain, Kyushu Ceramics Museum and Arita College of Ceramics. This visit was made possible by the Creative Industries Fund NL. The EKWC and Saga intend to encourage the sharing of technology and design quality, and to establish an Artist-in-Residence programme.

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Japan–NL exchange in the field of Arita ceramics

28 november 2014

The European Ceramic Work Centre (EKWC) has entered into a joint venture with the Saga Ceramics Research Laboratory in the town of Arita in Saga Prefecture, a region in southwest Japan that is renowned for its ceramic products. This cooperation falls within an agreement between Saga Prefecture and the Dutch Embassy in Tokyo that was signed in November 2013, with the aim of initiating exchange between Saga and the Netherlands in the Creative Industries. This will involve talented designers collaborating with the region’s producers (traditional and modern) and the fostering of teamwork between Dutch institutions and those in Saga.

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SeoulHollandPavilionPhotobyJacquesandre.jpgSeoul Design Festival Holland Pavilion. Photo by Jacques & André
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Report #2 Seoul: The Holland Pavilion

4 december 2014
In the context of exploring new possibilities for the international presentation of Dutch design, 10 designers participated in this year’s Seoul Design Festival with the backing of the Creative Industries Fund NL. These designers presented their projects in the Holland Pavilion. Bruno Vermeersch (Jacques & André) designed the pavilion as a plaza, a meeting place with lampposts and benches that would allow the public to mingle and talk about the exhibited projects and the theme.
The theme of this year’s festival was ‘Well-Aged Life, Well-Balanced Design’, as South Korea is also contending with a greying population. The festival attracted more than 100,000 visitors and there was plenty of footfall through the Holland Pavilion. The conversations between the designers and the public with the aid of interpreters proved to be a valuable experience. ‘Talking with people about the theme is in itself an important experience for my project’s development,’ notes Juliette Huygen, who presented her project about euthanasia. ‘Initially I didn’t really know what to expect and I was nervous about how people would react. It turned out that many people are familiar with euthanasia and are interested in having an open conversation about it.’

On Saturday, 29 November a group of senior citizens from the Gangnam Senior Plaza visited the pavilion. This was a highlight for the designers, as this is the target group for their projects. The senior citizens were enthusiastic. Also the project by Michou Nanon de Bruijn caught the attraction of the seniors. The group already talked about the costs of a ticket for the BrainTrain and if the train could drive in South Korea. Julia van Zanten discussed her Protective Underwear project with an elderly Korean woman, who emotionally indicated that she believed such projects would truly allow her to grow old more happily.

Interaction in projects for senior citizens
Jules van den Langenberg seized the chance to play bingo with visiting senior citizens, using his specially designed bingo set. The lamps by Studio Toer, which react to movement and sound, were a hit with the Korean public. ‘With our designs we want to ensure that objects which are usually static can display autonomous behaviour. We therefore focus on interaction and the creation of a dynamic atmosphere. Many of our projects come about because we explore things in a playful manner,’ Studio Toer’s Castor Bours and Wouter Widdershoven explain. ‘Our lamps bring vitality into the home, showing that furniture can provide company, for single elderly people, for example.’
By and large the festival was more of a consumer fair where businesses marketed their newest gadgets. This setting nevertheless presented opportunities for the designers to stand out. Many visitors passed by because the pavilion conveyed the festival’s theme so clearly. The Dutch approach also attracted media attention, with various designers giving interviews for magazines and TV, and there were plenty of requests for press packs.

The Holland Pavilion was made possible by the Creative Industries Fund NL, the Dutch Embassy in South Korea, the Design House and the East West Education Center.
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Seoul Design Festival Holland Pavilion. Photo by Jacques & André

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Lisa Mandemaker - Zero Hour. Photo by Jacques & André

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Harm Rensink - Bed of Olfaction. Photo by Michou Nanon de Bruijn

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Studio Toer – Moti. Photo by Jacques & André

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Bingo project by Jules van den Langenberg - The Medicine Called Fun. Photo by Michou Nanon de Bruijn

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Contestants during the Bingo project. Photo by Michou Nanon de Bruijn

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Holland Pavilion with at front the project Re-covered - Anne Feikje Weidema. Photo by Jacques & André

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Juliette Huygen - Euthanasia. Tales of Happily Ever After. Photo by Juliette Huygen

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Julia van Zanten - Protective Underwear. Photo by Michou Nanon de Bruijn

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Holland Pavilion with at front presentation of Tea-set Touch - Inge Kuipers. Photo by Jacques & André

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Image from the Brain Train out of the project Het NieuwGrijs - Michou Nanon de Bruijn


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SeoulHollandPavilionPhotobyJacquesandre.jpgSeoul Design Festival Holland Pavilion. Photo by Jacques & André
news

Report #2 Seoul: The Holland Pavilion

4 december 2014

In the context of exploring new possibilities for the international presentation of Dutch design, 10 designers participated in this year’s Seoul Design Festival with the backing of the Creative Industries Fund NL. These designers presented their projects in the Holland Pavilion. Bruno Vermeersch (Jacques & André) designed the pavilion as a plaza, a meeting place with lampposts and benches that would allow the public to mingle and talk about the exhibited projects and the theme.

more

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news

Report #1 Seoul Design Week: An Introduction to Heritage, Crafts and Materials

1 december 2014
In the context of the Open Call for Participation in the Seoul Design Festival, a group of 10 Dutch designers was selected to travel to South Korea last week. In advance of presenting their products and concepts during the Seoul Design Festival, these designers participated in a range of enlightening activities.
Monday the 24th of November marked the start of the official programme for the Dutch designers in South Korea, two days before the opening of the Seoul Design Festival (26–30 November). The first part of the programme involved an informative meeting about heritage and crafts. ‘In order to work in a country where progress and innovation are paramount it is important to know how that country has evolved,’ explains Jasmijn van Weenen, Grant Officer for the Creative Industries Fund NL’s Internationalization Programme and Project Manager within the Fund. ‘We therefore made a visit to the Korea Cultural Heritage Foundation, a government institution that is concerned with the preservation of Korean heritage and passing it down to future generations. It is devoted to introducing more people to tangible and intangible heritage. The institution also strives to inform a broader international public about centuries-old traditions and working methods.'

Workshop about Korean hanji paper and the traditional ieum carpentry technique
After the guided tour of the Korea Cultural Heritage Foundation’s exhibition space, the group gained insight into a diversity of traditional Korean production techniques, materials and processes. A workshop supervised by artisans allowed the designers to learn about and experiment with Korean heritage and historic work processes. The designers learnt how to work with Korean hanji, a paper produced from mulberry trees, and how to manufacture objects using the traditional ieum carpentry technique, which characteristically uses no nails. With this technique the various components dovetail into one another, as found in traditional hanok houses.

Visit to an old people’s home in the Gangnam quarter
The theme of this year’s Seoul Design Festival is ‘Well-Aged Life, Well-Balanced Design’. South Korea is also being confronted with exponential growth in the population aged 65 years and above. The visit to the Gangnam Senior Plaza care home was the second part of the programme for the designers. ‘“Healthy Aging, Active Aging, Productive Aging, Integrative Aging” is Gangnam Senior Plaza’s motto,’ Van Weenen reports. ‘Besides offering creative courses, the centre also provides medical care, inexpensive meals and even a dating service for senior citizens. Voluntary work is a mainstay of Gangnam Senior Plaza, hierdoor so that residents can give something back to society, feel they are useful, and continue to utilize their knowledge and many years of experience.’

After a short introduction and a presentation about the various activities in the centre, the group was given a guided tour of the six-storey building. ‘The centre was light and spacious, and the facilities were excellent. The atmosphere there was relaxed and cheerful. The centre’s focus is to ensure that growing older is not detrimental to your quality of life. This ties in with ‘The Medicine Called Fun’ project that Jules van den Langenberg is presenting during the Seoul Design Festival: How can you re-instil pleasure into the lives of senior citizens? The ‘NewGrey’ project by Michou Nanon de Bruijn also sketches various utopian worlds where senior citizens can continue to lead a worthwhile life. ‘A visit to the Gangnam Senior Plaza provided our group with useful insights into how we might find alternative ways of approaching ageing people, how you can continue to utilize skills and qualities, and how we can spend the later phases of our lives in happiness.’
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Activities in the Gangnam Senior Plaza

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Painting lessons in the elderly home


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Publication architect Karsten part of heritage campaign

21 november 2014
Thomas Karsten (1884 – 1945) was one of a small group of modern Dutch architects that included men like Henri Maclaine Pont and C.P. Wolf Schoemaker who developed their careers in the Dutch East Indies in the first half of the twentieth century. Karsten laid the foundations of modern urban Indonesia with work represented in Semarang, Solo, Padang, Palembang and Medan.
Text: Harmen Kraai

As this book demonstrates, while to date Karsten's work has not received the prominence internationally that it deserves, his work was of great contemporary significance for the way each of his designs introduced significant modern architectural and functional principles, incorporated the latest developments in construction and materials, and took into account the natural, social and cultural environment.

Karsten advocate of 'new architecture'
Although Karsten’s career took place in the Indies where he became a widely known and respected figure. Karsten was a product of the intellectual, cultural and professional transformation that took place in the Netherlands around the turn of the twentieth century. As a young man he was an advocate of the jugendstil arts and crafts movement and an early proponent of the ‘new architecture’ promoted by HP Berlage in the Netherlands. Already as a student he was at the forefront of curriculum changes at Delft that prepared the architects for their new role in society.

In today’s Indonesia where his architectural and planning legacy forms a major element in heritage projects in many Indonesian cities, Thomas Karsten is widely recognised. Two important buildings by Karsten have recently been restored: the people’s theatre Sobokartti (1931) in Semarang and the central market Pasar Gede (1929) in Solo. Some buildings have not survived but many, like the school, hospital and markets in Semarang, are still functioning in their original role.

Semarang heading for UNESCO world heritage city
A volume dedicated to the life and work of Thomas Karsten therefore forms an important contribution to Dutch cultural and colonial history. The Municipality of Semarang, with the support of a number of citizen groups, and provincial tourist and heritage authorities, is working towards having the city recognised by UNESCO as a world heritage city – ‘Semarang 2020’. This book on the life and work of Thomas Karsten, therefore, will form a major component in this heritage campaign.

Thomas Karsten in Indonesia: Architect, Planner, Modernist
Joost Coté and Hugh O’Neill
with contributions from Helen Ibbitson Jessup and Pauline van Roosmalen

This publication is supported through the Grant Programme for Architecture.

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Publication architect Karsten part of heritage campaign

21 november 2014

Thomas Karsten (1884 – 1945) was one of a small group of modern Dutch architects that included men like Henri Maclaine Pont and C.P. Wolf Schoemaker who developed their careers in the Dutch East Indies in the first half of the twentieth century. Karsten laid the foundations of modern urban Indonesia with work represented in Semarang, Solo, Padang, Palembang and Medan.

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An interim report on supported projects in Indonesia

17 november 2014
The Creative Industries Fund NL has recently supported a number of projects in Indonesia through its Internationalization Programme and the Grant Programme for Architecture. Here you can read more about the results to date for the following projects.
Krill-Office for Resilient Cities and Architecture organized a workshop in Yogyakarta to develop a toolkit for spontaneous urbanization. Bantul, one of the municipalities involved, has now given the undertaking to use these tools in practice.

Mo Smit (COCOCAN) and Annebregje Snijders investigated the possibilities for design-based research about the housing of employees of Dutch multinationals in emerging economies for their Home at Work project. Smit has written a report about this exploratory study.

The August Kemme Foundation is publishing a book about the life and work of architect Thomas Karsten (1884–1945). This publication is part of the city of Semarang’s campaign to be included on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2020.
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Workshop Proto Tamansari in Yogyakarta

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Research into housing of Indonesian employees


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An interim report on supported projects in Indonesia

17 november 2014

The Creative Industries Fund NL has recently supported a number of projects in Indonesia through its Internationalization Programme and the Grant Programme for Architecture. Here you can read more about the results to date for the following projects.

more

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Successful Proto Tamansari workshop in Yogyakarta

21 november 2014
The Krill Office for Resilient Cities and Architecture conducted a study of desakota areas in Indonesia. A desakota is an expansive area around a medium- or large-sized city that displays a combination of rural and urban characteristics. After studying the Projo Tamansari desakota, Krill sketched the outlines for a prototype desakota redevelopment.
The research focused on the Projo Tamansari district near Yogyakarta. Krill identified five urgent themes: mobility infrastructure, loss of ‘canopy coverage’ (protection provided by a roof of foliage), resilient agriculture, the village economy, and irrigation and flooding problems. Krill organized a workshop in order to assemble a set of instruments to help address these issues, thus offering alternatives for the unbridled spontaneous urbanization. This toolkit was developed further by interdisciplinary teams of architects and researchers from Indonesia as well as the Netherlands.

The workshop brought the desakota to the attention of local parties in a positive manner. The workshop format was designed to encourage the local community and authorities to become joint stakeholders in the resulting projects. The project also contributed to gaining in-depth knowledge and skills. Bandul Municipal Council has now made the commitment to implement the results of the project.

Parties involved: Krill Office for Resilient Cities and Architecture, Eko Prawoto Architecture Workshop, Felixx Landscape Architects and Planners, Sigit Kusumuwijaya Architecture and Urbanism, SHAU architecture and urbanism, Gajah Mada University, Duta Wacana Christian University, UNESCO-IHE and IHS, Pablo Tittonel (Wageningen University and Research Centre), Leo Haring and Widoyoko.

This research was supported by the Grant Programme for Internationalization.

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Successful Proto Tamansari workshop in Yogyakarta

21 november 2014

The Krill Office for Resilient Cities and Architecture conducted a study of desakota areas in Indonesia. A desakota is an expansive area around a medium- or large-sized city that displays a combination of rural and urban characteristics. After studying the Projo Tamansari desakota, Krill sketched the outlines for a prototype desakota redevelopment.

more

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Designer presentations at Seoul Design Festival

21 november 2014
One of the major challenges facing modern society is ageing populations. The Netherlands is not alone in having to cope with people living longer – today almost half its population is aged 50 years or more. South Korea is also dealing with exponential growth in the population aged 65 and above. The Creative Industries Fund NL selected 10 Dutch designers to share their perspectives on the social challenges presented by a greying population. They are presenting their products and concepts during the Seoul Design Festival 2014: Well-Aged Life, Well-Balanced Design.
These projects are being showcased at the Holland Pavilion during the Seoul Design Festival (26–30 November). The Fund has published a brochure to draw attention to the projects and products by Dutch designers. It can be downloaded as a PDF on this page. During the festival the designers will also be participating in a comprehensive programme to stimulate intercultural exchange. What parallels are there in Dutch and Korean design approaches? How can designers from these two countries help each other to find fitting responses to these pressing social issues? The Fund will be posting festival reports on this website over the coming weeks.

The selected designers and projects
Jules van den Langenberg - The Medicine Called Fun
Studio Dumbar - Visual Identity Alzheimer Nederland
Anne Feikje Weidema - Re-covered
Inge Kuipers - Tea-Set Touch
Studio Toer - Moti
Julia van Zanten - Protective Underwear
Juliette Huygen - Euthanasia. Tales of Happily Ever After
Lisa Mandemaker - Zero Hour
Harm Rensink - Bed of Olfaction
Michou Nanon de Bruijn - Het NieuwGrijs

Cooperation with the East West Education Center
This project is a collaboration with the East-West Education Center (EWEC) and evolved from a reconnaissance of commercial opportunities for Dutch designers in South Korea. The aim is to strengthen existing contacts and to make an inventory of new international platforms for Dutch Design. It offers participants the chance to establish enduring relationships in South Korea and to expand their international professional activities. The Holland Pavilion is funded by the Design House and the Creative Industries Fund NL.

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Designer presentations at Seoul Design Festival

21 november 2014

One of the major challenges facing modern society is ageing populations. The Netherlands is not alone in having to cope with people living longer – today almost half its population is aged 50 years or more. South Korea is also dealing with exponential growth in the population aged 65 and above. The Creative Industries Fund NL selected 10 Dutch designers to share their perspectives on the social challenges presented by a greying population. They are presenting their products and concepts during the Seoul Design Festival 2014: Well-Aged Life, Well-Balanced Design.

more

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Government publication about the creative industries

21 november 2014
The creative industries are highly significant for job and wealth creation, as well as for finding solutions to complex social issues. The creative industries are also helping to protect and revitalize cultural heritage, as well as opening the minds of younger generations to its value. This was the conclusion of more than 40 countries from Asia and Europe during the Sixth Asia-Europe Culture Ministers Meeting (ASEM).
The Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science produced a publication for this gathering, which took place in Rotterdam from 18 to 21 October. The publication examines the creative industries in the Netherlands, describing the major players in this sector and providing numerous examples of teamwork between the various ‘top sectors’. You can download the English-language PDF here. Dutch and German translations will be available soon.
» website

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Government publication about the creative industries

21 november 2014

The creative industries are highly significant for job and wealth creation, as well as for finding solutions to complex social issues. The creative industries are also helping to protect and revitalize cultural heritage, as well as opening the minds of younger generations to its value. This was the conclusion of more than 40 countries from Asia and Europe during the Sixth Asia-Europe Culture Ministers Meeting (ASEM).

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Dutch Design at Belgrade Design Week

21 november 2014
The organizers of the Belgrade Design Week 2014 invited Zuzanna Skalska (VanBerlo), Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn (Studio Drift) and Ido Garini (Studio Appétit) to facilitate workshops and give lectures during this design event.
The Belgrade Design Week includes Dutch design professionals in its programme every year and thus strives to serve as a catalyst for creativity and knowledge-sharing for the whole of Southeast Europe. Studio Drift talked about its winning proposal for the Kapellbrücke lighting installation in Lucerne, Switzerland. Zuzanna Skalska (Head of Trends at 360inspiration) discussed technology design as a network model that is uniquely Dutch. Ido Garini (Studio Appétit) explained his innovative approach to eating and addressed ways to control our most ravenous appetites. Designboom interviewed Garini about these ‘food cravings’.

Dutch Design at Belgrade Design Week was supported in the context of the Grant Programme for Internationalization. You can read the report in below PDF. Read the interview by Icon Magazine with Studio Drift here.

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Dutch Design at Belgrade Design Week

21 november 2014

The organizers of the Belgrade Design Week 2014 invited Zuzanna Skalska (VanBerlo), Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn (Studio Drift) and Ido Garini (Studio Appétit) to facilitate workshops and give lectures during this design event.

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Pilot project investigates the housing of Indonesian workers

21 november 2014
In the context of the Open Call: Exploring Opportunities for Internationalization, architects Mo Smit (COCOCAN) and Annebregje Snijders investigated the possibilities for design-based research about the housing of people employed by Dutch multinationals in emerging economies for their Home at Work project.
A report by Mo Smit

The Home at Work exploration involved three components: an historical survey of factory villages and cooperative housing for workers in Western Europe; compiling an inventory of the corporate visions of multinationals with regard to housing for workers; and field research into the current living conditions of employees of Dutch multinationals in Indonesia. The exploratory research led to the formulation of a concrete design task for workers’ housing in Indonesia. This assignment presents opportunities for the Dutch design sector and the business community to cooperate with local stakeholders in Indonesia.

The design task: cooperative upgrading of industrial kampongs
Visiting various factory sites on Java provided insight into the devastating impact of industrialization on city and countryside. Discussions with local worker communities, factory directors and government bodies cast light on the spatial, social and ecological problems that are associated with the industrial live-work environment. These insights provided the basis for the actual design task: the cooperative upgrading of existing industrial kampongs (Indonesian working-class neighbourhoods) that surround large-scale factory complexes.

Pilot project by Home at Work
The aim of Home at Work is to implement the design task using a practical pilot project. Besides focusing on housing, the pilot also aims to improve the urban networks for water, energy, mobility, waste, food and materials. The complexity of the design task calls for a cross-sectoral and international approach. During this exploration Home at Work garnered broad support from Dutch as well as Indonesian parties, including the Dutch Embassy, Alliander, MVO Nederland, TU Delft, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung Municipal Council and Bandung Creative City Forum.

The textile industry in Bandung
The exploratory study revealed that Bandung is the textile capital of Indonesia. The textile industry is of great economic significance, for Bandung as well as Indonesia. However, production methods continue to cause considerable social, ecological and economic damage. This context makes the textile industry an interesting case for Home at Work’s design task.
The Mayor of Bandung, Ridwan Kamil, is an architect who is very passionate about making Bandung into a shining example in the realm of Smart Cities & Communities. The local demand for an integral approach to problems associated with the textile industry in Bandung presents opportunities for the Dutch design sector to deploy its knowledge, experience and expertise. Making the textile industry more sustainable offers opportunities for Bandung and the Netherlands to distinguish themselves on the international stage.
Home at Work received supported via the Internationalization Programme.
» website

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Opportunities for architects and urban planners in Albania

3 november 2014
CITYFÖRSTER architecture + urbanism recently completed their investigative study in the context of the Open Call: Exploring Opportunities for Internationalization. Martin Sobota (CITYFÖRSTER) and Paul Gerretsen (Vereniging Deltametropool) undertook a six-day reconnaissance in Albania to explore opportunities for urban planning.
This exploratory visit was prompted by the election of Edi Rama – former Mayor of Tirana and a promoter of architecture and urban planning – as Prime Minister of Albania. ‘There is plenty for our profession to gain and the timing is ideal: the new government is aiming for a dramatic improvement of the coast and the local stakeholders support this,’ Sobota explains. ‘The towns of Divjakë and Xarre were particularly inspiring and the local community was very interested in cooperating.’ One of the key aspects revealed by this reconnaissance was the importance of data collection, such as the development of a ‘smart citizen’ app which can gather data about water quality and involve more locals in the project.
» website

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PICNIC activities during the Catapulta Festival in Mexico

3 november 2014
In the context of the Open Call: Exploring Opportunities for Internationalization, PICNIC investigated the possibility of organizing a PICNIC Festival in Mexico and Brazil. This reconnaissance has already prompted PICNIC to organize a range of activities during the Catapulta social innovation festival in Oaxaca, Mexico, bringing together social investors and social entrepreneurs in order to nurture sustainable social enterprises.
Oaxaca is a hub for organizations which are working on poverty issues to improve the lives of the poorest people in Mexican society. Under the motto ‘Redefine Growth’, PICNIC challenged social entrepreneurs from Mexico and Latin America to develop commercially sustainable and creative solutions for social and environmental issues. The activities that PICNIC organized during Catapulta included a discussion with Gustavo Madrid (director of Casa de Ciudad), Juan Jose Consejo Duenas (director of INSO), Carlos Hernandez (founding director of Fundacion En Via) and Salime Harp (founding director of Studio Xaquixe) as panel members.

Besides visiting the PICNIC Mexico Marketplace, a showcase by 20 Mexican social enterprises, the public could participate in the following workshops:
MakeSense Hold-Up Sessions: Festival participants mined their contacts, resources and networks to actively support social entrepreneurs at the Marketplace with their specific business challenges.
‘Re-designing Growth, One Social Enterprise at a Time’ Design Thinking Workshop: Together with CO_, the initiators of PICNIC Mexico, PICNIC organized this ‘design thinking workshop’ for young social entrepreneurs to help establish and grow their own enterprises.
‘Designing for the Anthropocene’ Workshop: PICNIC gave a design workshop aimed at finding new opportunities in the Anthropocene in conjunction with the New York-based Buckminster Fuller Institute. Director and founder David McConville helped participants to identify novel perspectives to solve social and environmental problems in their particular sectors.
‘Re-design Growth for Water Management’ Workshop: at the invitation of PICNIC and the Dutch Embassy in Mexico, Deltares gave a demo of its interactive ‘water map’ table and its water management game for government representatives and local water management experts.

This project was supported by the Open Call: Exploring Opportunities for Internationalization.

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PICNIC activities during the Catapulta Festival in Mexico

3 november 2014

In the context of the Open Call: Exploring Opportunities for Internationalization, PICNIC investigated the possibility of organizing a PICNIC Festival in Mexico and Brazil. This reconnaissance has already prompted PICNIC to organize a range of activities during the Catapulta social innovation festival in Oaxaca, Mexico, bringing together social investors and social entrepreneurs in order to nurture sustainable social enterprises.

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