creative industries fund nl
dummy
What about FREESPACE - Reporting from the Biennale
whataboutfreespace.jpg

What about FREESPACE - Reporting from the Biennale

19 July 2018

On Thursday July 5th, Het Nieuwe Instituut and the Creative Industries Fund NL presented an evening of contributions to the Venice Biennale of 2018. The evening completed a nearly year-long series of lectures, debates, open calls and discussions on the Biennale and its theme FREESPACE. The cycle of events opened with lectures on the Fund’s open call ‘Work, Body, Leisure’ during the Dutch Design Week in October 2017. In the end, the wide range of lectures, workshops, publications and contributions to the Venice Biennale encouraged an ongoing conversation on the societal impact of architecture, design and the creative industries.
Text by Lara Schrijver

sensory experiences
This year’s Biennale presented a broad palette of sensory experiences, from imagery that draws in the spectator to installations with a highly material articulation. Most of the objects triggered an immediate visceral response, more direct and compelling than the intellectual framework for each installation. Notwithstanding the thorough and clearly delineated intentions of the curators, the sensory took primacy over all other approaches. Engaging and provocative, it could be tempting to approach this Biennale as a purely aesthetic experience, which therefore disengages from societal and political challenges currently facing the world. After all, if it is aimed at the senses, how could it possibly provide a critical view to society?

Yet nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the proposition of Grafton Architects in FREESPACE seeks to connect people to their environment in a more coherent way. It suggests that the challenges are more easily faced if the environment is amenable to fostering observational skills, connections and a sense of generosity. More than that, though, it allows its observers to seek their own questions and draw their own conclusions. These spaces give rise to an affinity that draws in observers, provokes them to explore further, and thus allows new perspectives to appear.

multiple perspectives on FREESPACE
This undercurrent is what drew the evening’s participants together. Each contribution provided its own distinctive approach to the material, performative, and social interpretation of FREESPACE, from a film registration of a dance performance to a study of Irish marketplaces as a model for understanding social cohesion. The multiple perspectives provided a springboard for addressing the issues put forward in the curatorial statements on FREESPACE, shaping the conversation throughout the evening. While the discussion remained necessarily brief after six presentations, shared questions for the future could be traced through the program: how might architecture and design help to address or even reposition societal challenges? How may design proposals reveal hidden social mechanisms? How may our built environment challenge our preconceptions, or indeed foster unforeseen connections?

‘What is it that brings us together, what are the connections that run throughout people, places, and cities?’


After a brief introduction highlighting the collaborative efforts of the Fund and Het Nieuwe Instituut, the main program began with a 10-minute film by Make Move Think, which compiled the ideas and registration of a dance event held during opening weekend: a dancer on a quay, shards of poetry in the background and the occasional voice explaining the qualities of Venice. During the film, the audience was notably silent – the quiet and steady rhythm of the film seemed to be mirrored by the audience. As unusual as it might be to include this performance in the notes of the Biennale, it also goes to the core of FREESPACE. What is it that brings us together, what are the connections that run throughout people, places, and cities? The body in space is one of these shared elements between architecture and dance, fully justified as a starting point. Moreover, this film directly questioned the assumption that a direct and fundamental exploration of the material, the performative, and the artistic, may be seen as escaping traditional forms of academic reflection and thereby circumventing critical discourse.

All of the evening’s presentations – four pavilions, one installation in the central pavilion, and one registration of a dance performance – in fact provided space to rethink the divide between the material and the intellectual. Even with the wide range of topics – how much does a dance performance have in common with a manifesto on nation-building or the documentation of rural marketplaces? – the underlying commonalities became increasingly apparent as the evening progressed. Most projects explored (urban) spaces from more than one perspective, and highlighted both their social and their formal characteristics.

hetnieuweinstituutwhataboutfreespace25vo.jpg
What about FREESPACE in Het Nieuwe Instituut. Photo: Maarten Nauw

After the film, Traumnovelle presented their installation for the Belgian pavilion, an EU-blue circular tribune that transformed the interior of the pavilion based on their question of how architecture can become part of a political project. Situated somewhere between utopia and a future fiction, their installation even triggered one visitor to post a dance on Instagram. The Dutch pavilion, curated by Marina Otero Verzier, was a bright orange locker room with hidden doors and cabinets showing various interpretations of the pavilion’s theme of ‘work, body, leisure’. The rigorous structure of the lockers reflects the highly regulated contemporary landscape, questioning where we can still find FREESPACE in today’s world.

In the following presentation, Jeffrey Bolhuis showed how the Irish pavilion recreated the marketplace typical of rural Irish towns. The installation will be shipped to Ireland after the Biennale and continue raising awareness on the nature and the necessity of social cohesion, here materialized in the marketplace. The Turkish curatorial team approached its pavilion as a ‘global masterclass’, inviting students and professionals to contribute to the pavilion through workshops in situ. Finally, Michelle Provoost presented Crimson Architectural Historian’s installation on The City of Comings and Goings. In various media, this installation presented the topical issue of migration in all its facets: not just refugees, but expats, temporary labor forces, different types of travelers, showing the impact on our cities of these regularly moving groups of people. The installation included an image of this fictional city in the style of Saul Steinberg, a Nolli-plan of the public spaces related to migration, and six theses on migrations (harking back to the original positions nailed to the church door by Luther).

‘nation-buildig’ and the role of architecture
Notably, a number of the questions during the discussion underlined the continuing discomfort with the issue of ‘nation-building’ and the role of architecture in relation to political and institutional structures. The discussion showed how Europe is still struggling to transcend national identities, also visible in the project ‘Europa’ by Central Office for Architecture and Urbanism. This lighthearted installation placed on the three neighboring pavilions of Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands spells out ‘Europa’ in neon letters with the colors of each nation’s flag, overwriting the names of the individual countries. In the debate, both the need for more collective action was underscored, as well as a general resistance to the very idea of nation building. One member of the audience questioned whether adding new (even if more neutral) structures such as the ‘metanation’ suggested by Traumnovelle was the answer to Europe’s identity crisis. Léone Drapeaud responded that their proposal was less about traditional ‘nation-building’ and more about a platform that emphasizes common aims and actions.

hetnieuweinstituutwhataboutfreespace69vo.jpg
What about FREESPACE in Het Nieuwe Instituut. Photo: Maarten Nauw

a different approach to the socio-political
At the same time, alongside the pressing political concerns voiced in the debate, there is an undercurrent of social concern that cuts across political lines and national boundaries. Drawing the contributions together is an open-ended demonstration of the contemporary conditions each of these groups observe in today’s city – not documented in numbers or shown in data collections, but rather encapsulated in symbols, in materials, in spaces and even in dance. The tangible, individual experience, the subjective observation and the manner in which these objects, images and performances provoke the observer to reflect and draw their own conclusions, delineates a different approach to engaging with the socio-political sphere. It is a departure from clinical, scientific observation, yet it does not retreat into the purely individual sphere. Instead, it encourages debate, and dialogue.

Strikingly, all the contributions presented this evening were by some type of multidisciplinary, collaborative group. This seems to draw new contours for the future of the architect, replacing the mythical male genius with a network of reflective practitioners. The contributions were diverse, yet held together through shared concerns. Three pairings in the overall program show these distinct but common interests. The two pavilions most easily captured in a single image, a blue tribune (Belgium) and an orange locker room (The Netherlands), pointedly encouraged unforeseen interventions by their visitors. The two pavilions that explicitly engaged with the Biennale as a process in time (Turkey and Ireland) show how the actual building and exhibiting of architecture is but one moment in a trajectory of social and spatial configurations. And finally, the assemblage of symbolic and performative gestures that come together in the dance performance and the multiple media of the City of Comings and Goings show how the material and even ephemeral crystallization of collective ideas can have a lasting impact upon our cities and our imaginations.

more news

opencalltturkijeruslandegyptemarokkoen.png

Open Call Turkey, Russia, Egypt, Morocco #2

19 September 2018

Creative Industries Fund NL is calling on designers, makers, curators and cultural organizations in the Netherlands to submit a plan for a project that deploys design for sustainable and inclusive societies. The open call invites cultural parties to join forces with a local partner to turn their minds to a topical issue, observation or development in Turkey, Russia, Egypt or Morocco. The project should entail an egalitarian collaboration between the parties.
The rapid growth of cities is a topic that is relevant in the four countries that the open call is focusing on, resulting in new relationships between street culture, identity and public space, as well as between the city and the countryside. The appropriation of the city by various parties – grassroots and top-down, public and private, established and emerging – takes a diversity of forms, in the physical as well as the virtual domain. Designers are being asked to put topical themes that relate to the city, its surroundings and users on the agenda, to question them or propose solutions. This calls for cross-disciplinary and context-sensitive collaborations at the interface of culture, new media, technology, craft, society and the new economy.

collaboration
The project team (of Dutch and local partners) adopts a standpoint concerning sustainable and inclusive societies within the theme that the project focuses on. The plan provides insight into how and why various stakeholders will be involved with the project. Projects can take a diversity of forms, from artistic, speculative or design-based research to the implementation of a pilot, intervention or campaign. The perspective of Turkish, Russian, Egyptian or Moroccan parties is crucial and should be embedded in the project.

focus
This is a follow-up to the first series of Open Calls focused on these four countries that the Fund issued previously. As a result of findings concerning the first series of open calls, the Fund is more emphatically seeking for projects that relate to disciplines in the fields of design and digital culture, as well as every possible crossover.

submissions
Projects can be submitted from 1 December 2018 to 21 January 2019 via Creative Industries Fund NL’s online application environment. Find more information about the Open Call here.

questions?
For questions about the open call and the procedure, please telephone +31(0)10 436 16 00 or send an e-mail to Yasmin Kursun via [email protected] or Zineb Seghrouchni via [email protected].
ldfweb.jpg

26 Dutch designers show work at London Design Fair 2018

6 September 2018

The London Design Fair is being staged from 20 to 23 September. The Fund has joined forces with the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) to realize the Dutch Stuff pavilion, where 26 Dutch design studios, collectives and individual designers are showcasing their work.
After a successful debut in 2017, Dutch Stuff is being staged at the Old Truman Brewery for the second time. The pavilion’s initiator and curator, Jimmy MacDonald, explains his fascination with Dutch designers as follows: ‘The Netherlands has always been our go-to country for experimental design, which is central to the curation of this second edition of Dutch Stuff. As many of the designers have been sourced over the last 10 months, we are excited to see where these experiments have led and how they may have manifested in new products and collections by September.’

highly promising design talent
In 2018 the 26 participants will have more space to present their work, allowing visitors more opportunity to enter into conversation with the designers, to peruse the work, and become acquainted with the underlying concepts. Dutch Stuff is intentionally conceived as an eclectic, multidisciplinary presentation that represents the breadth of the design discipline in the Netherlands. The pavilion is showing furniture design, lighting design, textiles, ceramics and free design, such as objects and installations. The selection is a mix of highly promising design talent and more established names who are experimenting with methodologies, materials and means of collaboration in their work.

The participants include alumni of the Grant Programme for Talent Development, such as Alissa+Nienke and Boris de Beijer, as well as designers who have previously enjoyed the Fund’s support to take part in the Salone del Mobile in Milan, such as Earnest Studio and VANTOT.

panel discussion
The Fund is joining forces with London Design Fair and the Embassy of the Netherlands to organize a panel discussion moderated by designer Ineke Hans and design critic Max Fraser in the Dutch Stuff pavilion from 10:30 to 12:30 on 20 September. Together with some of the participating design studios, the moderators will discuss the artistic and professional opportunities and challenges for Dutch designers in the British market.

participants
VANTOT
lennartlauren
Studio Simone Post
Systemises
Studio Plott
Studio Johan Viladrich
Martijn Rigters
Nina van Bart
Studio Laurids Gallee
Boris de Beijer
Fabian Briels & Hans van Sinderen
REM atelier
Maria Tyakina Studio
Studio Ro-Smit
Atelier van Middendorp
Bart Joachim
Creative Chef
Earnest Studio
Alissa+Nienke
forever studio
Studio Jeroen Wand
Christian Hammer Juhl
OS & OOS
Made by Rens
londondesignfairsophiemutevelianweb.jpg

internationalization
The Fund is supporting the pavilion with a contribution from the supplementary resources of the Internationalization programme. The Fund’s contribution means that up-and-coming Dutch designers can expand their field of activity and position themselves more effectively within the international design sphere.

Photo above: London Design Fair, Dutch Stuff 2017. Photographer: Sophie Mutevelian

holland2018gamescom64web.jpg

Dutch games developers at Gamescom 2018

6 September 2018

In late August, approximately 370,000 visitors from 114 countries visited Gamescom in Cologne, the most important European fair for consumers and professionals in the games industry. This is the place to network and build structural relationships in national and international circles for games companies and individual developers. Creative Industries Fund NL backed the Dutch Games Association (DGA) in its organization of the Holland Pavilion for the fourth time.
The increase in the number of participating countries and professional visitors underscores Gamescom’s international character and the importance of Europe’s most trend-setting business platform in the realm of games. Alongside Austria and the United Kingdom, the Netherlands ranks among the three most rapidly expanding countries in the fair’s business section.

networking: B2B
Five game developers presented their work in the Holland Pavilion within the fair’s B2B section with the Fund’s support. The combination of indie developers and presentations by a number of larger Dutch games studios bore fruit once again. The indie developers note that the pavilion served as an important meeting place for budding professionals and was a valuable complement to planned meetings with publishers, game developers, media and investors. For example, Luuk Waarbroek of games studio Napalm Tree spoke with potential leads, while indie developer Erik Habets of Fromto made highly promising steps towards finding a publisher. Meetings with international contacts are simpler to plan here, and deals are struck wherever possible. That makes this event the ideal networking opportunity within the European and global games industry.

holland2018gamescom57web.jpg

public: B2C
The Fund also supported two Dutch game developers – KeoKen and Ronimo Games – to present themselves at the Indie Arena within the B2C section. The massive turnout gave the studios the opportunity to promote their games to a wide-ranging public in a short time. Both stands were really busy and drew plenty of attention from visitors. Joost van Dongen of Ronimo Games: ‘The personal contact with consumers at Gamescom gives a great deal of satisfaction and is really useful for finding new customers.’

Show Your Courage
Creating games is one thing, but bringing them to the market successfully is something else. At Gamescom there are all kinds of key industry figures in attendance who can help games companies in this regard, as young developers often lack experience in pitching and networking. This prompted the Dutch Games Association (DGA) and Dutch Game Garden to organize Show Your Courage. A selection of veterans from the games industry were interviewed about a diversity of topics within the sector, which gave others the opportunity to enter into discussion with peers and learn from their expertise. This whole programme has been recorded in high-quality video and is easy to find on the DGA website.

holland2018gamescom41web.jpg
Visitors play the game Mish Mash developed by Doron Hirsch, where players of the game are drawing parts of the game step by step.

Photos: Dutch Games Association (DGA)

dacoc12of39.jpg

22 Oct: Designing a Community of Care | From creative research to practice

22 August 2018

During the Dutch Design Week 2018, Creative Industries Fund NL and Waag are organizing the ‘Designing a Community of Care: From creative research to practice’ network meeting, in association with the Aedes-Actiz Knowledge Centre for Housing, Care and Welfare and the Who Cares team. You are warmly invited to join us.
In the Netherlands we are reinventing care. An ageing population, decentralization and technological advances are making new demands on the provision of care in our communities. Creative Industries Fund NL and Waag believe in the power of design’s contribution to this process of transition within care in the community.

what can you expect?
an inspiring keynote lecture by Prof. Paul Chamberlain, design director Lab4Living Sheffield Hallam University, and Dr. Claire Craig, health director Lab4Living Sheffield Hallam University, both founders of the conference and the journal Design4Health;
networking with other interested partnersincluding care professionals and designers;
a guided tour of the ‘Chronic Health’ exhibition at the Embassy of Health about the role of designers within healthcare.

Do want to join us in building a community of practice?
Join us on Monday 22 October for Designing a Community of Care at the Embassy of Health in the Innovation Powerhouse at Strijp-T, Eindhoven.
The programme is currently under development and will soon be added to this page. Keep an eye on the Fund’s various channels of communication.

Designing a Community of Care
The reason for this meeting is the Open Call: Designing a Community of Care, which was issued by the Fund in the spring of 2018. Thirteen projects have been initiated, in which designers are tackling changes to care in the community in conjunction with municipal services, care providers and housing corporations. You can find further information via this link (Dutch only).

keynote speakers
Prof. Paul Chamberlain, Design Director of Lab4Living at Sheffield Hallam University
Dr Claire Craig, Health Director of Lab4Living at Sheffield Hallam University

Good design can mean a lot for society, but how can design practices and processes help to tackle the challenges we are facing in the 21st century? Paul Chamberlain argues that design is as much about the definition of the question as it is about providing an answer, and that interdisciplinary collaboration is the starting point for new creative possibilities. In Claire Craig’s former role as an occupational therapist she gained experience in the advancement of the wellbeing of the elderly, and she believes that design plays a pivotal role in this field.

‘Chronic Health’ exhibition
The Embassy of Health is an initiative of Waag, VanBerlo, Philips, Máxima Medical Centre, U Create and the Dutch Design Foundation. The ‘Chronic Health’ exhibition reveals how we are jointly shaping care. We show how care products or services are not autonomous, but interact within a complex care environment. The exhibition immerses visitors in an interactive environment and allows them to experience the current and prospective role of design for (health)care: now, as well as in the immediate and more distant future.

practical information
date: Monday, 22 October 2018
time: 13:00 – 17:00
venue: Innovation Powerhouse (Strijp-T), Zwaanstraat 31a, 5651CA, Eindhoven

registration
Participation in the meeting is free of charge. Please register by sending an e-mail to [email protected], mentioning ‘Designing a Community of Care’ in the subject line. Please provide your name, position and organization in the email itself. Enrolment will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

updates
Would you like to keep up-to-date with developments in relation to ‘Designing a Community of Care’ and other healthcare-related news from the Fund? Sign up for the Care newsletter by sending an e-mail to [email protected], mentioning ‘Registration for Care newsletter’ in the subject line.

Photo above: Sander van Wettum
bringiton95of193.jpg

6 Sept: Grant Programme for Internationalization Advice

8 August 2018

Do you want to submit an application for the third round of the Grant Programme for Internationalization and do you have a specific plan that you wish to present to the Fund’s staff? If so, then register now for the Grant Programme for Internationalization Consultation Session that Creative Industries Fund NL is organizing at Het Nieuwe Instituut.
The Internationalization team will be ready to offer advice and help you to improve the application. With this grant programme the Fund supports projects that substantively contribute to nurturing, publicizing and reinforcing the international position of today’s creative industries.

date: Thursday, 6 September
time: between 16:00 and 19:00 (each consultation lasts a maximum of 20 minutes)
venue: Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam

registration
Register by 2 September at the latest via [email protected], mentioning ‘Grant Programme for Internationalization Consultation Session’ in the subject line. In the message provide your name, organization and the country (or countries) where you intend to implement the project, as well as the discipline(s) involved.

Photo above: Aad Hoogendoorn
loader

the fund

grants

latest

opencalltturkijeruslandegyptemarokkoen.png
Creative Industries Fund NL is calling on designers, makers, curators and cultural organizations in the Netherlands to submit a plan for a project that deploys design for sustainable and inclusive soc... more >
holland2018gamescom64web.jpg
In late August, approximately 370,000 visitors from 114 countries visited Gamescom in Cologne, the most important European fair for consumers and professionals in the games industry. This is the place... more >
teamthursdaypresentation.jpg
Are you planning to present your work outside the Netherlands or has a foreign organization invited you to speak at a conference or symposium? If so, then you can apply to the Fund for a Voucher for P... more >
loader
loader
loader